Seven-Per-Cent-Solution

An eclectic collection of interests, inspirations, aspirations and things that either delight or intrigue me.

Reblogged from beardsleyjones

(Source: 500px.com)

Reblogged from kiyoaki

(Source: de-la-valliere)

Reblogged from lostinamerica

"The free, exploring mind of the individual human is the most valuable thing in the world."

Reblogged from explore-blog

Happy birthday, John Steinbeck – celebrate with one of the most beautiful meditations on the creative spirit and the meaning of life ever written. (via explore-blog)

Reblogged from explore-blog

explore-blog:

New favorite site: Corpus Libris, which applies the concept of analog augmented reality to book covers. Best thing since Sorted Books.

(via this isn’t happiness)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

Here’s a few images from our new video about popcorn (the inside of an unpopped kernel, a popped kernel, and a super close-up of a popped kernel). Watch the whole thing:

Special thanks to Murry Gans, who provided the amazing electron microscope images of popcorn’s bubbly structure. You read / listen to more about the science and history of popcorn here.

This is some CORNY stuff, but great POP-ular science.

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

awkwardsituationist:

paul bourke, associate professor at the university of western australia, scours google earth looking for fractal patterns, or self similarity, in the rivers systems, mountains ranges and deserts of the planet. in nature, self similarity doesn’t exist ad infinitum, as with a mandlebrot set, but branching structures are found across two, three, even four scales. paul invites people to submit their own finds to his site, which links to the pictures shown here on google earth (click pics for the country)

(learn more about fractals on “hunting the hidden dimension”, pbs nova)

This project is several layers of recursively cool.

Reblogged from 1-98-5

(Source: valscrapbook)

explore-blog:

Amazing Maps plots the World Culture Score Index in an atlas of which countries read the most.
1. India — 10 hours, 42 minutes2. Thailand — 9:243. China — 8:004. Philippines — 7:365. Egypt — 7:306. Czech Republic — 7:247. Russia — 7:068. Sweden — 6:548. France — 6:5410. Hungary — 6:4810. Saudi Arabia — 6:4812. Hong Kong — 6:4213. Poland — 6:3014. Venezuela — 6:2415. South Africa — 6:1815. Australia — 6:1817. Indonesia — 6:0018. Argentina — 5:5418. Turkey — 5:5420. Spain — 5:4820. Canada — 5:4822. Germany — 5:4222. USA — 5:4224. Italy — 5:3625. Mexico — 5:3026. U.K. — 5:1827. Brazil — 5:1228. Taiwan — 5:0029. Japan — 4:0630. Korea — 3:06
Of course, then there’s the question of qualifying the quantified – what are people reading, exactly? Because, as Susan Sontag memorably observed, only a fraction of published books are actually literature.
(via Mental Floss)

Reblogged from explore-blog

explore-blog:

Amazing Maps plots the World Culture Score Index in an atlas of which countries read the most.

1. India — 10 hours, 42 minutes
2. Thailand — 9:24
3. China — 8:00
4. Philippines — 7:36
5. Egypt — 7:30
6. Czech Republic — 7:24
7. Russia — 7:06
8. Sweden — 6:54
8. France — 6:54
10. Hungary — 6:48
10. Saudi Arabia — 6:48
12. Hong Kong — 6:42
13. Poland — 6:30
14. Venezuela — 6:24
15. South Africa — 6:18
15. Australia — 6:18
17. Indonesia — 6:00
18. Argentina — 5:54
18. Turkey — 5:54
20. Spain — 5:48
20. Canada — 5:48
22. Germany — 5:42
22. USA — 5:42
24. Italy — 5:36
25. Mexico — 5:30
26. U.K. — 5:18
27. Brazil — 5:12
28. Taiwan — 5:00
29. Japan — 4:06
30. Korea — 3:06

Of course, then there’s the question of qualifying the quantified – what are people reading, exactly? Because, as Susan Sontag memorably observed, only a fraction of published books are actually literature.

(via Mental Floss)

Reblogged from kaleidoscope-view

jabberjack:

thelittlestotter:

Every American should watch Jon Stewart. The world would be a better place.

I actually like jon stewart more than colbert, but that’s not saying much as I love them both.

(Source: sandandglass)